Why Nobody Can Survive in the North Pole

Published by : BRIGHT SIDE
A lot of expeditions have mysteriously ended in disasters. In the past, many ships got stuck on the ice, and people were stranded. Some ships have sunk and were never found. Not to mention that the Arctic Ocean underneath is still relatively unexplored. Did you know that even though the South Pole is colder than the North Pole, it gets approximately 20,000 visitors per year? Whereas the North Pole only gets about 1,000, including expeditioners. Why is that?

We’ve managed to explore almost all of our planet’s land, including all the inhospitable locations. And the North Pole made that list. So, what makes this place so dangerous? Why would Santa Claus choose to make this place his headquarters? What’s really going on there? Let’s try to figure it out!

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TIMESTAMPS:
North Pole Vs. South Pole 🌍 0:56
What if you get lost in the North pole 2:36
Does anybody live there? 5:03
No drinkable water (Wait... What?!) 😨 6:17
What about animals? 7:19
Melting of the North Pole 9:26

#northpole #arctic #brighrside

SUMMARY:
- The ice is approximately 6 to 10 feet thick, and it’s floating in an ocean that’s anywhere from 3,500 to 18,000 feet deep.
- Even though the North Pole is literally ice, it’s actually warmer than the South Pole.
- The North Pole is ice surrounded by land, and the South Pole is land surrounded by ice. The waters underneath the North Pole are warmer than the floating ice – and the ocean warms up the air a bit.
- The North Pole has more complicated entry barriers. The main one is that it doesn’t have a fixed location. It’s just large chunks of ice that constantly move around the Artic Ocean.
- Imagine you’re walking in the woods and you get lost. Your best chance out of there is a compass. But, if you’re in the North Pole, then you’re in big trouble.
- Speaking of not being able to find your way out of there: figuring out what time it is can also be an issue in the North Pole.
- No-one really lives in the North Pole; even Inuit people who live in the surrounding Artic Regions of Russia, Greenland and Canada have never made it their home.
- There’s no drinkable water at the North Pole. Early Artic Explorers had a hard time dealing with thirst. In fact, finding water in the Artic is as difficult as finding water in the desert.
- Speaking of survival, there’s no vegetation in the North Pole. Trees require soil, and since the North Pole is a large block of ice, it doesn’t allow any plants to grow.
- Artic Foxes, Polar Bears, and many other terrestrial animals don’t often migrate to the North Pole, because it can be an unpredictable environment.
- Polar Bears are the largest bears on earth, and they can only survive in the freezing weather of the Artic.
- Scientists now believe that in 50 years there’ll be no Ice in the North Pole during the summer, and they’re carrying out expeditions to research things further.

Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/

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